Women, Population and Global Crisis

A Political-Economic Analysis

Asoka Bandarage

Description

A critique of the assumption that over-population is one of the root causes of global crisis, this book places the population-poverty-environment-security debate within a broad theoretical perspective.
It has been widely assumed that over-population is one of the root causes of global crisis; even amongst feminist and environmental movements, the common wisdom on population has never been seriously critiqued. This book provides that critique; it gives a historical overview of the population question and places the population-poverty-environment-security debate within a broad theoretical perspective.

A major contribution to the socio-historical analysis of population-poverty-environment relations, this book cuts across the North/South divide bringing to light the dialectics of gender, race and class on a global scale. As such it is essential reading for students and academics in women‘s, development and environment studies as well as in philosophy, social theory and courses on ethnic relations.

Author Bio

Asoka Bandarage is an associate professor at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute in Washington, DC.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part I: Malthusianism: Theory and Practice
    • 1. Malthusian Analysis of Global Crisis
    • 2. Politics of Global Population Control
  • Part II: Political-Economic Analysis
    • 3. Historical Evolution of Socio-Demographic Relations
    • 4. Social Structural Determinants of Fertility
    • 5. Political Economy of Poverty
    • 6. Political Economy of the Environment
    • 7. Political Economy of Violence and Insecurity
  • Part III: Paradigm Shift: From Domination to Partnership
    • 8. Towards Psycho-Social Transformation
  • Appendix 1. Women, Population and the Environment: Call for a New Approach
  • Appendix 2. The Seville Statement on Violence
  • Appendix 3. Responsible Wealth: A Call to Action
  • Appendix 4. Networks and Organizations

Reviews

'Placing the needs of women, and particularly women of color, at the enter of her analysis, Bandarage shows how the contradictions in the social and economic realities that dominate their lives jeopardize the well-being of us all. Her proposals for cooperative and democratic efforts to stem poverty give hope that we can build societies respectful of the needs of people and the rest of the natural world.'
Ruth Hubbard, Harvard University

Details

Publication Date: 1 June 1997
384 pages

Product ISBNs: Paperback: 9781856494281
Library Edition: 9781856494274

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